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by on July 24th, 2014

Ginger Glazed Mahi Mahi

A fisherman’s tale. (by George)

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Since this dish would not be possible without the fish my husband caught I decided maybe he should be the one to write his fisherman’s tale.

NOTE: My Corn Dog Shrimp recipe just got picked up by Delish.com. They linked back to my website. Hopefully that will give me more traffic.

A fisherman’s tale — by George. 

My recent fishing trip topped off a year of fishing than has run the gamut from remote wild river salmon fishing and off-shore halibut trips in Alaska to white bass fishing in Texas and now most recently going off-shore for yellow fin tuna near Venice as in Louisiana (not to be confused with Italy). Venice is about an hour or so south of New Orleans on the peninsula that forms the tip of the Louisiana boot and the mouth of the Mississippi river. It’s literally the last town at the very end of the last road that follows the western side of the river deep into the thick Louisiana marshland to the river’s end, the Mississippi River delta. It’s not a fancy resort type area like you would find along the Florida coast but it has world class fishing and it is a major staging area for off-shore drilling companies and on-shore natural gas processing (which I used to know a little about)

We were hoping to get into some yellow fin tuna as more are caught here than anywhere but after catching our live bait near  a nat gas platform and then a 40 mile  ride out to the deep blue gulf waters (around 1500 feet plus) and hours of very hard fishing we gave up and starting trolling for Mahi Mahi. The highlight was when 3 of them all hit at exactly the same time. The reels seemed to spin out of control and we learned first hand how fast and strong these fish really are.  It’s hard to describe how vibrant their colors are in the water. Unfortunately for us that was all we would land for the rest of the day. We blamed it on the weather – what else?

Most people think you only catch them in Hawaii but Mahi Mahi is a type of saltwater fish commonly found in warm coastal waters around the world, including Southeast Asia, the Caribbean, and even some parts of Australia and yes – the Gulf of Mexico.

The word mahi  is Hawaiian for “strong.” The fish is known in Spanish as the “dorado” or in English, the dolphin fish. Now don’t get too upset with me; we are not talking about Flipper, the bottlenose dolphin, an air-breathing mammal.  The dolphin fish (Mahi Mahi) is just that, a fish not a mammal.

Mahi Mahi are incredibly beautiful fish. They are fast-growing and live no more that five years. They can swim over 50 mph and light up like a neon sign when on the run with electric hues of blue, yellow and green.

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Mahi-mahi is known for its firm white flesh and generally sweet flavor. It’s less “fishy” tasting than other species and there’s lots of ways of serving it. It’s dry, flaky texture makes a good base for many different sauces, crusts, and flavors.

Here’s how we prepared it.

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I love using the little frozen garlic cubes I bought at Trader Joe’s

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Mix all the marinade ingredients and marinate the Mahi Mahi for 20 minutes. Reserve the marinade. He did the fish on the grill instead of in a skillet.

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I served the Mahi Mahi with the reduced sauce (marinade) and my Avocado Melon Salsa.

Ginger Glazed Mahi Mahi
(recipe from DECODIANA at All Recipes)

3 tablespoons honey







In a shallow glass dish, stir together the honey, soy sauce, balsamic vinegar, ginger, garlic and olive oil. Season fish fillets with salt and pepper, and place them into the dish. If the fillets have skin on them, place them skin side down. Cover, and refrigerate for 20 minutes to marinate.

Heat vegetable oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Remove fish from the dish, and reserve marinade. Fry fish for 4 to 6 minutes on each side, turning only once, until fish flakes easily with a fork. Remove fillets to a serving platter and keep warm.

Pour reserved marinade into the skillet, and heat over medium heat until the mixture reduces to a glaze consistently. Spoon glaze over fish, and serve immediately.

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